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afootballreport:

Capturing American Fútbol: From Tijuana to Rio

Four friends of the AFR Team, Pete, Petar, Sam & Austin, have decided to take a trip from Los Angeles to Brazil, and they’ll be capturing everything (North, Central and South) American fútbol along the way. For their first stop on the way to Brazil, they spent a week in Tijuana profiling Los Xolos and their role in changing the perception of the world’s most busiest border town. Find their first dispatch here and follow their journey here.

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gobookyourself:

Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell

Congratulations to Katherine Rundell, winner of the 2014 Waterstones Children’s Book Prize! For more whimsical storytelling, try these next…

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead for proper old-fashioned storytelling mixed with a healthy helping of whimsy 

My Name is Mina by David Almond for a truly unique heroine taking control of her own future

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente for a quirky fantasy adventure 

Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine for a strong female voice exploring what it’s like to have Asperger’s

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gobookyourself:

Remainder by Tom McCarthy

For more sanity-dissolving books about mental unraveling, try these next…

The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei for insight into the psychological devastations wrought by creative ad agencies

Here Lies Gerald by Robert Travieso for a delusional subway ride into mental collapse

Moby-Dick by Herman Melville for a book that’s less about finding a white whale and more about a monomaniac losing his mind 

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger to remind yourself that your childhood hero was suffering from a nervous breakdown

This post was guest edited by Benjamin Samuel, Co-Editor of Electric Literature and Recommended Reading. You can find him on Twitter.

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theatlantic:

Lone Survivor's Takeaway: Every War Movie is a Pro-War Movie

Peter Berg’s Lone Survivor opens with documentary footage of a boot camp for the United States Navy SEALs, where hardbodied trainees strain their way through feats of endurance and strength. The point of this sequence, it seems, is to show how exceptional the real-life SEALs are before introducing SEALs as characters. With soldiers’ conviction and might thus demonstrated, the film can then whisk a few of them off on a mission that, as the title suggests, does not end particularly well.

But this montage serves another, more insidious function. Assembled like a high-gloss music video and slathered in Explosions in the Sky’s soaring post-rock, it plays out like an advertisement for the Marine Corps—an affectionate endorsement from Hollywood of the SEALs’ peerless brawn.

Adapted from the memoirs of former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell (played in the film by Mark Wahlberg, who also co-produced), Lone Survivor is the sort of film you expect to seem at least a little propagandistic. It’s rooted in a tradition of patriotism as old as the motion picture itself, stretching from the John Wayne vehicle The Green Berets to the recent Act of Valor. Many of its more aggressively nationalistic elements are just a matter of following genre protocol.

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